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Lanark County 4-H Archery Club Attends Mounted Archery Demonstrations at LeeView Farms

Submitted by Tandra-Lee Drew
Lanark 4-H - Lanark County Archery
(Posted September 17, 2018)

Lanark County 4-H Archery Club attends Mounted Archery Demonstration at LeeView Farms

By: Tandra-Lee Drew

 

On June 2, 2018, both the senior and junior groups of the 4-H Lanark County Archery Club were invited to attend LeeView Farms, which is just outside Carleton Place, for an amazing opportunity. They were invited to watch Allan Hamilton perform and demonstrate mounted archery. Mr. Hamilton performed his mounted archery on a black 24-year-old quarab mare (arabian x quarter horse) named Socks (whose registered name is Morning Glory).

When we got to LeeView Farms, we were shown how to use a recurve bow and whistling arrows. The whistling arrows were made by Mr. Hamilton. We, also got to try the recurve bows so we could feel the difference between compound and recurve bows, if we chose to.

Before the performance, Mr. Hamilton told us about the history of Hungarian and Korean-style mounted archery. For mounted archery, it is recommended to use a 52, 54, or 56 inch recurve bow with a draw weight of between 25-45 pounds.

The Hungarian course is 90 meters long with a 3 central target system at the 45 meter mark. There is a forward target, side target, and backward shot target. It must be run in 16 seconds or less, otherwise the rider is disqualified. A point is added to the rider’s score for each second below 16 seconds, if they happen to complete it that quick. The rider needs to shoot as many arrows as possible into the targets and they are also not limited to how many arrows that can be shot at once. The riders usually hold onto their arrows in hand, that are going to be shot next. They do six runs of the course, all which must be done at a canter or gallop.

The Korean course is 150 meters long and there is no time limit. There are three targets and they are spaced 30 meters apart starting with the first target at 30 meters into the course. These targets are regular round or square targets that may and often resemble a dart board style look. The rider with the fastest time and most points wins. In this style of mounted archery they are required to store their arrows in a quiver, belt or a boot. Only one arrow per target is allowed in this style and riders are NOT allowed to hold their arrows in their hand. Bows must not have any kind of arrow rest or be a centre shot.

At the end of the demonstration we were given a chance to ask any questions that we had. There were many great questions such as how old his horse was, breed of horse, was it hard to train his mare to do this and where can you go to learn this sport. Not only does Mr. Hamilton perform and do demonstrations of mounted archery, he also teaches mounted archery; so if this interests you give him a shout!

It was very educational for us and a great experience. We cheered and clapped as he did each run. Our 4-H club thanked Mr. Hamilton for his demonstration and time by giving him a gift as a token of our appreciation, though Socks kept trying to eat it!

As things were wrapped up on this beautiful day and some of us continued to ask questions to learn more about this interesting sport, we were given a snack of cookies, watermelon and bottled water. This was greatly appreciated by all, so a big thank you to all who brought these for us all to enjoy! Also, on behalf of the Lanark County 4-H Archery Club, I would also like to thank our wonderful leaders Kim and Mark Dowdall, Allan Hamilton at LeeView Farms and everyone else made this day possible for us kids!

 


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